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Brain-Computer Interfaces: One Possible Future for How We Play

Mike Ambinder (Principal Experimental Psychologist, Valve)

Location: Room 2010, West Hall

Date: Friday, March 22

Time: 10:00am - 11:00am

Pass Type: All Access, GDC Conference + Summits, GDC Conference - Get your pass now!

Topic: Vision

Format: Session

Vault Recording: Video

Audience Level: All

While a speculative technology at the present time, advances in Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) research are beginning to shed light on how players may interact with games in the future. While current interaction patterns are restricted to interpretations of mouse, keyboard, gamepad, and gestural controls, future generations of interfaces may include the ability to interpret neurological signals in ways that promise quicker and more sensitive actions, much wider arrays of possible inputs, real-time adaptation of game state to a player's internal state, and qualitatively different kinds of gameplay experiences. This talk covers both the near-term and long-term outlook of BCI research for the game industry but with an emphasis on how technologies stemming from this research can benefit developers in the present day.

Takeaway

Attendees should leave the talk with an understanding of the pros and cons of various lines of BCI research as well as an appreciation of the potential ways this work could change the way players interact with games in the future.

Intended Audience

This talk is geared towards anyone with an interest in interface or interaction design or who is curious about how game design may evolve as a consequence of access to physiological signals.